Besides eternal torment for “sinners”, what are other similarities in Greek and Christian Mythologies?

Besides eternal torment for “sinners”, what are other similarities in Greek and Christian Mythologies?
sinner in as being one who goes against god or gods. Christian mythology has hell, Greek mythology has Tartarus..
mrglass, I said Tartarus not Hades. Tartarus was the section of Hades reserved for the people who went against the gods somehow,

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Answer by mrglass08
You have a very poor concept of what sin would be. All people are sinners according to Christianity who all deserve Hell but through grace are rescued from this. In Greek mythology all men are destined for Hades with various levels dependent on your actions in life. Christianity realizes that you will never be good enough to earn better than what we deserve, separation from God and without God that is what would happen.

If I remember correctly Tartarus was merely a level of Hades. It was also not the destination of all men whereas that is what Hell is without God because that is what we deserve.

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3 Responses to “Besides eternal torment for “sinners”, what are other similarities in Greek and Christian Mythologies?”

  • Kit-Kat Jesus says:

    Mithras, the savior in ‘Mithraism’ was an astrological figure represented by the sun. He was sacrificed at dusk and he would rise again every day in the morning. His disciples were the 12 astrological signs of the zodiac. There was a blood drinking and flesh eating ritual (holy communion) in which all in attendance would consume the sacrifice (a bull).

  • elbigRA says:

    Dionysus and Jesus are spitting images of each other. While Jesus was busy “turning water into wine,” Dionysus had already reached the acclaim of “god of the grapevine.” Plus, Zeus’ oppressive power is comparable to God’s fury in so many ways. These vague examples are all that I can think of off the top of my head.

  • username_hidden says:

    The Biblical story of Noah has similarities with the Greek myth of Deucallion and Pyrrha.

    http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/myths/qt/101807Deucalion.htm

    Ignore the person above who cited Mythras. Firstly Mythras was Persian, not Greek, and, secondly, most of the presumed similarities with Christianity are more associated with the late, Romanised, version of the Mythraic cult rather than the original form.

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